John Speller's Web Pages Chicago, Detroit & Canada Grand Trunk Junction Railroad (GTR)

John Speller's Web Pages - US Railroads

Chicago, Detroit & Canada Grand Trunk Junction Railroad (GTR) Untitled Untitled Untitled Untitled
The Chicago, Detroit & Canada Grand Trunk Junction Railroad was chartered in Michigan on 25 March 1858 to build a 60 mile 67 chain railroad from Fort Gratiot, just north of Port Huron, Michigan, to West Detroit. The President was Thomas Evans Blackwell (1819-1863), who was also the first Vice President and General Manager of the Grand Trunk Railway of Canada. The line was constructed between 1858 and 1859. In 1859 the Grand Trunk Railway completed its line to Sarnia, Ontario, and instituted a ferry service across the St. Clair River to Port Huron, Michigan. The Grand Trunk Railway took a lease on the Chicago, Detroit & Canada Grand Trunk Junction Railroad, which remained a nominally independent company until 1928 and then became part of the Canadian National Railway's US subsidiary, the Grand Trunk Western Railroad. West of Detroit the Grand Trunk relied on the Michigan Central Railroad for access to Chicago. Besides the single main line of 60 miles 67 chains, in 1917 the Chicago, Detroit and Canada Grand Trunk Junction Railroad had 11 miles 0 chains of double track and 79 miles 41 chains of sidings. The principal intermediate stations between Port Gratiot and Detroit were Smith’s Creek, Ridgeway, New Haven, New Baltimore, Mount Clemens and Utica. It was on the line from Port Huron to Detroit that a 12-year-old Thomas Edison held his first job as a newsboy and candy seller on passenger trains.
Map of the Chicago, Detroit & Canada Grand Trunk Junction Railroad
The original depot from Smith's Creek, which was relocated by Henry Ford to Greenfield Village in 1929. Photo by John Speller
An 8-wheeler with a passenger train at Mount Clemens in around 1900
A hand-colored photograph of the railroad depot at New Haven, Michigan, around the time of World War I
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