John Speller's Web Pages Narrow Gauge

John Speller's Web Pages

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As an advocate of Brunel's 7' 0" broad gauge I use the term "narrow gauge" to refer to the 4' 8" gauge. Most people call this "standard gauge," but it is actually also called narrow gauge in the Gauge Act of 1846, which is what made it standard!

No. 1363 was one of five Churchward saddle tanks built in 1910 for dock work, for shunting on curves of limited radius. They were basically a rehash by one of Churchward's assistants, H. Holcroft, with Stephenson valve gear, of some earlier saddle tanks built by the Cornwall Minerals Railway. The originals had had Allan valve gear. The "1361" Class were the last saddle tanks ever built for the Great Western Railway, since Churchward was responsible for making pannier tanks standard on the GWR. For me another of these, No. 1364, was an old friend, since it was often to be seen shunting outside my old school, Taunton School in Taunton, Somerset. The ex-Cardiff Railway saddle tank No. 1338 was also a familiar friend. For classic videos of Paddington Station in 1939 see Video 1 and Video 2
No. 1363 was one of five Churchward saddle tanks built in 1910 for dock work, for shunting on curves of limited radius. They were based on some earlier saddle tanks built by the Cornwall Minerals Railway
System Map of the Great Western Railway following the Grouping of 1923
GWR Worcester Express at Hayes behind Dean Single. Note that the caution indication for GWR signals was red rather than yellow before 1927
Churchward "City" Class 4-4-0 No. 3440 "City of Truro," said to have reached a speed of around 100 m.p.h. at Wellington, Somerset, on 4 May 1904
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