John Speller's Web Pages Stone Souling Song

John Speller's Web Pages - Souling
Stone Souling Song Untitled Souling Index Untitled
The Manchester City News for December 1902 prints this souling song that was sung in Stone, Staffordshire

O here we come a souling. I hope you'll prove kind,
I hope you'll prove kind with your ale and strong beer.
Souling comes but once a year, and when it does it brings us here.
The cock sits up in the yew-tree, the hen goes cackling by.
I wish you a merry Christmas, and a good fat pig in the sty.
The roads are very dirty, my shoes are very thin.
Put your hand in your pocket and pull out your keys,
Go down in the cellar and bring what you please,
Apple or pear or plum or cherry --
What you please to make us merry.
One for Peter, two for Paul, and three for him that made us all.

Alexander Morison McAldowie, Staffordshire Knots (Stoke-on-Trent, 1895) has the following variant version:

Souling-day comes once a year,
When it comes, it finds us here.
The cock sits up in the yew-tree,
The hens came cackling by,
I wish you a merry Christmas,
And a good fat pig i' the stye.

Peter stands at yonder gate
Waiting for a soul-cake;
One for Peter, two for Paul,
Three for Him who made us all.

Another variant, collected in Staffordshire by George E. Hurt of Kensington in 1897 reads:

A soul cake pray good dame a soul cake,
An apple, a pear, a plum, a cherry,
Or any good thing to make us merry,
One for Peter, two for Paul,
Three for Him Who made us all.

Peter was a good old man,
For his sake you'll give us some:
Some of your best and none of your worst
And God will send your souls to rest.

Up with your kettles and down with your pans;
Give us some apples and we'll be gone.
Put your hand in your pocket, pull out your keys,
Go down in the cellar, bring what you please.

If you bring nothing you'll do it for spite,
And we'll remember you the bonfire night.
The cock sits up in the yew tree,
The hen goes cackling by,
We wish you all a merry Christmas,
And a good fat pig in the sty;
A pantry full of pork pies,
A cellar full of beer,
And to all a happy New Year.

The roads are very dirty,
My shoes are very thin.
I've got a little purse,
Will you please put a penny in?

Compare also the Stafford Souling Song.
The church and windmill at Stone in Staffordshire
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